Unity?

I am a fan of the idea of unity. It is a marvelous concept—-but what does it mean, is it really a virtue, and how is it obtained?

In our history as a nation we have seldom experienced unity. The attack on Pearl Harbor provided us a common rallying point for a month or two but then FDR decided to intern our Japanese fellow citizens. The 9-11 attacks held us together in purpose for about a week before the finger pointing began.

Obama was ostensibly elected by the Left to end the wars in the Middle East. Has that happened? The Left is now demanding “unity” after the Arizona shootings but they are not even unified in their own purposes. They just want to derail the juggernaut of disaffection careening their way as a result of their own divide and conquer strategy of control. Don’t fall for it. They don’t want unity. If they could they would send people like me to the gulags and you know it.

Looking back, Vietnam was not a rallying point for our culture or our politics.

We managed to hang together to defeat the Germans and the Japanese (and Italians) in WWII but were not unified, by any accounting, in that pursuit.

In World War One we outlawed the German language; interesting reaction considering that 29% of all Americans are of German descent, the largest single group comprising the American family.

Then there was the Civil War. What did that have to do with unity?

Our revolt against Great Britain only managed to capture the active participation of 4% of the population of the 13 colonies.

Don’t preach unity to me unless you are willing to gather around a firm set of principles, which, in our secular society, is embodied in our Constitution. If we can agree on that, I’m in, to a degree. We are about exercising liberty, not marching in lockstep.

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